Frequently Asked Questions

Setting up your login information is fast, easy, and can be completed in a few simple steps. Click sign up at the top of any page to get started. Account access on mygreatlakes.org is available to anyone with a student loan serviced or guaranteed by Great Lakes.

Once you've completed the signup process, you can log in anytime to view information about your loans and the repayment options available to you.

Don't worry—it happens to all of us at one time or another. If you forgot your user ID, password, or PIN, or if you're receiving an error message, follow the steps on Trouble Accessing Your Account.

A student loan guarantor's primary mission is to manage the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) on behalf of the federal government. Duties range from enforcing federal student loan rules and regulations to counseling student loan borrowers who may be unable to make their payments. This guarantee allows lenders to be reimbursed for loans that may default. (Federal student loans default when borrowers do not make any payments on their loans for 270-360 days and do not make special arrangements with their lender to get a deferment, forbearance, or other form of payment relief.)

A student loan servicer provides you with the tools and resources you need to successfully manage your loan—from the point your first loan amount is disbursed (delivered) through your school, to the point you've entirely paid off your loans. At Great Lakes, our servicing role includes:

  • Keeping you up-to-date with information about your student loans.
  • Monitoring your school enrollment and status while you're in school.
  • Assisting you as you pay back your loans.
  • Helping you find the best repayment plan for your budget.
  • If consolidation is right for you, guiding you to complete the application where you'll be asked to choose one of the U.S. Department of Education's consolidation servicers, of which, Great Lakes is one of them.

Get to Know Great Lakes and How We Help

Through a rigorous application process, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) selected Great Lakes and a few others to service federal student loans. You can find out which organizations are servicing your federal student loans by visiting the National Student Loan Data System Offsite .

A student loan originator assists with your loan application. Great Lakes has been one of the largest and most respected originators in the country. In this role, we've helped millions of students successfully apply for, and receive, student loans.

Through a rigorous application process, the U.S. Department of Education (ED) approved Great Lakes to originate Direct Consolidation loans. If consolidation is a good solution for you, we can guide you to:

  • Information to help you make an informed decision.
  • Gather important application information from mygreatlakes.org and the National Student Loan Data System Offsite .
  • Complete the application on ED's website, where you'll be asked to choose one of the U.S. Department of Education's consolidation servicers.
  • Stay informed about your application's progress using your mygreatlakes.org account.

Once the application is completed and approved, for loans serviced by Great Lakes, we'll become your servicer. You'll begin making payments toward your new loan, and we'll provide you with the tools and resources needed to successfully manage your loan.

You, Your Loan, and Great Lakes

  1. Step 1
    You, Borrower
    Decide

    You apply for a Direct Consolidation loan.

  2. Step 2
    Us, Originator
    Application Status & Approval

    For loans serviced by Great Lakes, contact us for help. We review, monitor, and approve your application.

  3. Step 3
    Lender
    Money

    Your existing loans are paid off. Your new consolidation loan is funded.

  4. Step 4
    Us, Servicer
    Welcome to Great Lakes Servicing

    We provide you with all of the tools needed to successfully repay your loan.

  5. Step 5
    You, Borrower
    Stay in Touch

    Access your mygreatlakes.org account to keep your contact information updated and receive important loan information. Follow us on Facebook Offsite and Twitter Offsite .

As one of the nation's leading student loan servicers, Great Lakes services Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) loans, Federal Direct Loan Program (Direct Lending) loans, and private loans.

  • FFELP loans were funded by private lenders, such as banks or credit unions, and are guaranteed by the federal government. This guarantee allows lenders to be reimbursed for loans that may subsequently default. FFELP loans are sometimes called lender-held or commercially-held loans.
  • Direct Lending loans are funded by the federal government and do not need a guarantor. The federal student loan program shifted from FFELP loans to Direct loans in July 2010. Since then, all federal loans have been made through Direct Lending. The U.S. Department of Education (ED) lends the money, disburses (delivers) it to you through your school, and your servicer helps you manage the loan. Direct loans are sometimes called federally-held loans.
  • Private student loans are funded by private lenders, such as banks or credit unions. There are no federal forms to complete and eligibility can depend on your credit score. They are sometimes called alternative education loans.

We're here to help you manage and successfully repay your student loans whenever you need us. With a wide range of contact options available to suit your preferences, Great Lakes is just an email, letter, or phone call away.

Click Contact Us, available on every page of mygreatlakes.org, to get started. Remember, you can also access a variety of self-help resources on mygreatlakes.org to get the information you need 24/7.

We love happy customers. Your satisfaction is very important to us, and we welcome your feedback to make sure we're providing you with the help you need and expect.

Take our two-minute survey Offsite to share your thoughts with us. Your input helps us make changes to mygreatlakes.org that will benefit you and all of our customers.

The main difference between subsidized and unsubsidized loans is who is responsible to pay the interest on the loan while you are enrolled in school at least half-time.

  • With subsidized loans, the federal government pays the interest on the loan while you're in school at least half-time and during a deferment.
  • With unsubsidized loans, the borrower is responsible to pay the interest on the loan.

It's easy to find out what type of federal loan you have.

  • Log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, and view your Account Summary. The Account Details for each loan will tell you the loan type, interest rate, lender, loan balance, and more.
  • You can also visit the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) Offsite . It tracks all outstanding federal student loans until they are paid in full. It provides a listing of each loan, the loan amount, and the total of all of your loans. You will need your Federal Student Aid ID to access the information.

No. You are not required to pay interest while you're enrolled in school at least half-time.

If you borrowed:

  • Subsidized loans. The government pays the interest on the loan while you're in school or in a deferment (postponement).
  • Unsubsidized loans. You aren't required to pay interest while you're in school or in a deferment (postponement). But interest will accrue and capitalize. If you pay the interest while you're in school, it will save you money in the long run.
  • Parent PLUS loans. You aren't required to pay interest if you deferred (postponed) the payments while the student is enrolled at least half-time. But interest will accrue and capitalize.

Log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, and find out what types of loans you borrowed and if interest is accruing while you're in school.

While you're enrolled in school at least half-time, you aren't required to make payments on your loans. Simply contact your school to determine what is considered half-time enrollment.

If you're enrolled in school less than half-time, you'll need to begin making payments once your grace period is over. If you are:

  • Able to make full payments, that's great! It's the fastest way to pay off your loans and reduces how much you'll pay in interest.
  • Unable to make full payments, but can pay a lower amount, you have options. View different repayment options that may be available to you. A lower monthly payment may cost you a little more in the long run, but you'll have a payment you can afford. And you can always pay more later to save money and pay off your loans more quickly.
  • Having financial difficulties, take action now for options to postpone or lower your monthly payments. These options usually cost more in the long run, but can help you avoid missing any payments, which can damage your credit.

Regardless of the path you take to repay your loan, we're here to help. Contact us if you can't make a payment, or have any questions about your loans.

The National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) Offsite is the U.S. Department of Education's central database for federal student aid. It tracks all outstanding federal student loans until they are paid in full and can help you determine how much you owe and who you owe it to.

When you log in using your Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID, you'll see a listing of each of your loans, the amount of each loan type, and the total amount you owe for all of your federal loans combined. You can also see your grants, even though you don't have to pay those back.

To review your repayment options for suspending or lowering your monthly payments, select Repayment Options from the My Repayment Plan menu, and then select the scenario that best fits your situation. You'll be guided through your available options and prompted on how to move forward.

If you are still unsure about your options, contact us.

Info

Keep in mind that your income-driven repayment application will not be processed if you're still in school more than half-time.

There may be several reasons why your Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID isn't working.

  1. You may be entering something incorrectly. To use your FSA ID, you must enter your user name and password exactly as you entered them when you created your ID.

  2. The U.S. Department of Education (ED) may not have completed their match with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Your FSA ID is considered to be conditional until your information is verified with the SSA. You may use your FSA ID to:

    1. Sign an initial Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSAŪ), and

    2. Participate in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) data retrieval and transfer process.

    Once they complete verification with the SSA (1-3 days), you'll be able to use your FSA ID to access your personal information on Federal Student Aid (FSA) websites.

  3. Their records show that the SSN, name, and date of birth you provided on your FSA ID application do not match the information on file with the SSA.

    1. Apply for an FSA ID again if you believe you entered incorrect information when you applied the first time.

    2. Contact the SSA if you believe their information is incorrect.

  4. You previously disabled your FSA ID. If you'd like to use your FSA ID again, you must re-enable it by logging in to the FSA ID home page Offsite .

  5. You haven't created your FSA ID yet. If you previously used your FSA Personal Identification Number (PIN) to access information on FSA websites, you'll need to create an FSA ID. To create an FSA ID, select Create An FSA ID Offsite on ED's FSA ID home page.

  6. You havenīt used your FSA ID and password for 18 months or more. After 18 consecutive months of nonuse, your password expires. If you log in and your password has expired, you will be required to change your password.

The main differences between Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE), Pay As You Earn (PAYE), Income-Based Repayment (IBR), and Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR) include eligible loan types, when you took out the loan, the repayment timeframe, and how your payment amount is calculated.

For more details, please visit our Income-Driven Repayment Plans Knowledge Center topic or Federal Student Aid's Repayment Plans Offsite page.

In general, the monthly payment amount is based on your income, family size, and the state you live in, as well as the type of plan you're eligible for and when you took out your federal student loans. For more details, visit our Income-Driven Repayment Plans Knowledge Center topic or Income-Driven Plans Offsite on the Federal Student Aid website.

Use our Repayment Options tool to review your available repayment plans. You'll be asked questions about your individual circumstances and be provided with monthly payment estimates that best fit your situation. The tool will provide you with all of the options you're eligible for and allow you to compare them.

Each of the income-driven plans has different eligibility requirements. Start at Repayment Options to find out if you're eligible. If you want additional details, please visit Income-Driven Repayment Plans in our Knowledge Center or Income-Driven Plans Offsite on the Federal Student Aid website.

When you begin making payments under an income-driven plan, your monthly payment will remain the same. However, each year you must resubmit documentation to provide your updated income and family size. If these things have changed, your monthly payment amount may increase or decrease based on those changes.

Learn more about income-driven repayment and how to apply in our Knowledge Center.

These plans can offer a lower monthly payment. However, whenever you make lower payments, it extends the amount of time it will take to pay back your loan. Consequently, the overall amount you end up paying in interest will be more. In addition, if the remaining balance at the end of your repayment period is forgiven, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may require you to pay income tax on it. Learn more about income-driven repayment and how to apply in our Knowledge Center.

Recertifying your plan involves the same steps you took to apply the first time—providing updated information about your family size and income. Then we'll provide you with an estimate of your new monthly payment under an income-driven repayment plan. If you want to stay in IDR, we'll provide you with the information you need to complete your recertification on StudentLoans.gov. As a reminder, once you start your application, you'll have 30 minutes to complete it.

Recertify your IDR plan, or see if you're eligible for IDR.

If you don't recertify your income-driven repayment plan by the deadline, your payments may increase and any unpaid interest will be capitalized, or added to your principal balance when a new payment schedule is created.

Learn more about IDR recertification requirements and what happens if you don't recertify.

The monthly payment amounts for income-driven repayment plans are based on changing variables like your income, family size, and the state you live in. Submitting documentation every year is necessary to recalculate your monthly payment amount and ensures you maintain the lowest monthly payment available to you. Learn more about income-driven repayment and how to apply in our Knowledge Center.

There could be a number of different reasons why your application was rejected, like an unsigned form, missing information, or our inability to read supporting documentation. Whatever the reason, we'll contact you by email, letter, or phone to explain the situation and alert you to any action you need to take in order for us to continue processing your application.

Monthly payments under an income-driven repayment plan are based on your income and family size. Since these items can change, your payments will change along with them.

If your income changes, we suggest you recalculate how it will affect your monthly payment amount by going to Repayment Options. From there, if you want to formally recalculate your monthly payment amount, go to What Do I Gather Before Applying? for a refresher on the income documentation you'll need to gather ahead of time.

Yes. If you can afford it, making payments while you're in school is a great way to reduce the amount you will owe in the long run. Find out more about how payments are applied and the ways to make a payment (online, using our mobile app, by phone, etc.).

Great Lakes offers many free payment methods, including one-time electronic payments (Pay Online), automatic monthly electronic payments (Auto Pay), payments by phone, and check or money order payments by mail.

To make a payment or find out more about each payment method, log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, and select the option that works best for you.

How your payments are applied to your student loans depends on a number of factors. In most cases, payments are applied first to any accrued interest and fees, then to your principal balance. Check out How Payments Are Applied for different scenarios that may apply to your situation.

Payments must be applied first to interest and fees, then to loan unpaid balance. This means that only the amount that exceeds interest and fees owed is applied to the unpaid balance. There are common situations in which all, or most, of your payments will be applied to interest and fees. For example, when you're on a Graduated repayment plan, if you've missed or skipped a few payments and then make a payment, if you're on an income-driven repayment plan, or if you don't make a payment within 30 days of entering repayment. Find out more about how payments are applied.

To view your monthly payment amount, log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, and choose Account Summary from the My Accounts menu. If you are required to make a payment, the amount displays.

To change your monthly payment amount, log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, and choose Repayment Plans from the My Repayment Plan menu. Here, you'll find an overview of your repayment options and an estimate of what your monthly payment amount could be under each repayment plan. Once you've decided which plan is right for you, we'll guide you through the steps to change your plan.

As long as your account is not past due, log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, to select a new payment due date for your eligible Great Lakes loans. If your account is past due, contact us for more information.

When you're ready to pay off your Great Lakes-serviced student loans, finding the correct payoff amount is easy. Log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, to view your Account Summary, and then view the details for the loan you want to pay off. Choose get payoff amount and enter your desired payoff date to display your payoff amount.

If you would like to authorize Great Lakes to discuss your student loans with an individual or entity not related to your loans, please log in to mygreatlakes.org, if you haven't already, and submit the Information Release Consent form available on the forms page.

Your payment schedule is a plan for paying back your loan. You have one payment schedule for each of the accounts in your Account Summary that you're making payments on.

It provides monthly payment amounts, due dates, and other important information that you need to keep track of. We'll send you a new payment schedule when certain conditions on your account change, like when you start to make payments, have a change in repayment terms, add a new loan, or come out of a deferment or forbearance.

Auto Pay is our automatic payment processing system that allows you to automatically withdraw your student loan payments from your checking or savings account. It is free, easy to use, and helps you better manage your finances.

Yes, you can enroll in Auto Pay even if you don't have any payments due. By making early payments you can save money and reduce what you owe in the long run.

For accounts that do have payments due, when you enroll in Auto Pay, you authorize automatic monthly payments on all these accounts.

As an endorser or cosigner, you can't directly enroll in Auto Pay for the loans you endorsed or cosigned. Keep in mind that you can log into mygreatlakes.org with your information and make a one-time payment on any loans you endorsed or cosigned using Pay Online.

Alternatively, you can ask the borrower to set up Auto Pay using your bank account information. If you choose to do this, your bank account will be used for all of the borrower's accounts that are enrolled in Auto Pay, including those you endorsed or cosigned, as well as any other accounts the borrower may have.

We'll need a few days to process your request and activate your automatic payments. If you have a payment due in the next 10 days or want to make a payment during that time, you'll need to use another payment method.

If you have student loans in repayment and are enrolled in Auto Pay, you still receive monthly billing statements. The monthly billing statement includes your loan balance, payments to-date, and payments coming due.

Money is withdrawn from the checking or savings account you select on your scheduled payment due date. If you do not have loans with payments due, Great Lakes withdraws money from the checking or savings account you select on the withdrawal date you choose. Your payments are credited on your due date or withdrawal date, regardless of when your financial institution debits your account. If your due date or withdrawal date falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, the money is withdrawn the next business day, but your account is credited on your due date or withdrawal date.

Please allow 2-3 business days for payments to display in your account details

We withdraw money from the checking or savings account you select on your payment due date. You can select a new payment due date for eligible Great Lakes accounts. If your loans don't have a payment due, you can select which day of the month (1st through the 28th) you want Great Lakes to withdraw money from your checking or savings account.

Yes, you can increase your Auto Pay amount at any time on mygreatlakes.org. When you enroll in Auto Pay, you can specify an additional amount to be withdrawn each month. If you're already enrolled in Auto Pay, you can modify your monthly payment amount. This is a great way to pay your loan off more quickly.

Yes, you can pay an additional amount at any time when you are in repayment. To increase your Auto Pay payment, modify your Auto Pay withdrawal amount. You can also make a separate payment with Pay Online.

Not at this time. Auto Pay automatically withdraws money only on your payment due date or withdrawal date.

If you pay an additional amount using another method, such as Pay Online, our mobile app, or a check, your monthly payment is still withdrawn from Auto Pay.

Your monthly payment amount is set and won't change unless your repayment terms change, for example, if you change your repayment plan or exit a deferment or forbearance. If it does change and you are enrolled in Auto Pay, you will receive a new payment schedule detailing your new payment amount and date. A few weeks later, you'll receive an email reminding you of the change.

If you are in school and transitioning to repayment while enrolled in Auto Pay, your payments will also change. When they do, you will receive a payment schedule letting you know your new payment amount and withdrawal date. You will receive an email reminder before your payment is withdrawn.

If you are in school and making payments through Auto Pay, you may change your Auto Pay withdrawal amount and date at any time.

If you are in repayment and making student loan payments through Auto Pay, any new loans that enter repayment are added to Auto Pay.

If there's not enough money in your account to cover your automatic payment, we'll attempt to withdraw the money twice, just like we would if it were a returned check.

Your financial institution may apply overdraft fees if you don't have enough money in your account on your due date or withdrawal date. We are not responsible for any overdraft fees assessed by your financial institution. If you have three consecutive failed payment attempts, we'll automatically deactivate your Auto Pay. If you're receiving an interest rate reduction for using Auto Pay, you'll lose the incentive. Depending on the type of loan you have, you may be able to regain this benefit by re-enrolling in Auto Pay.

If you change your checking or savings account and want to continue using Auto Pay, it's important to modify your Auto Pay settings with your new information.

No. To use Auto Pay, your financial institution must be located in the United States, or one of its territories.

You can enroll in Auto Pay even if your account is past due. However, Auto Pay does not resolve any past due amounts. You can take care of your past due amounts by making a payment using one of our alternative options. You can make a payment online, by phone, or by mail. This is a great way to pay your loan off more quickly.

When you are in repayment, you can temporarily postpone or lower your payments with a deferment or forbearance. During a deferment or forbearance, your Auto Pay is put on hold. When your deferment or forbearance ends and you enter repayment again, you receive a new payment schedule, informing you of your new monthly payment amount and the date.

If you would like to pay your interest or make additional Auto Pay payments while on deferment or forbearance, you can. Just modify your Auto Pay settings to indicate how much you would like to withdraw each month.

Don't wait to change to a more affordable option! Learn how you may be able to:

Changing your plan to a new one can give you the relief you need. If you think you'll have trouble making your payments or are already past due, don't hesitate to contact us and we can help you get started.

Act now to change your repayment plan! If you're unemployed, aren't earning enough, or simply not working as many hours as you need to, your federal student loans provide options to postpone or lower your student loan payments. With a few clicks of the mouse you can find out if you're eligible for a new repayment plan, select the best option for you, apply online, and start feeling the relief of a lighter student loan payment.

Unemployed or working less than 30 hours a week, and actively seeking full-time employment?

Postpone your payments with an unemployment deferment. It only takes a few minutes to answer some questions and submit the request for unemployment deferment. We'll take it from there. (Certain criteria apply.)

Working 30+ hours a week, but aren't making enough money and want a lower monthly payment?

Answer a few questions to determine which repayment plan may work best for you and your loans. One based on your income (as well as other factors) could reduce your monthly payment down to $0.

Repayment plans based on your income depend on things like your annual income, family size, and the types of loans you have. It's easy to get additional information and instructions on how to apply for an income-based repayment plan.

Everyone's situation is different. But it's easy to review the available options and find out if you're eligible. Get the highlights on your repayment options. From there, you can get additional information on:

  • Postponing payments with a deferment or forbearance.
  • Reviewing different repayment options to lower your payments, including those based on your income.
  • Log in to mygreatlakes.org for more information.

Great Lakes allows you to change your repayment plan once a year (or more if your life circumstances drastically change, like becoming unemployed, returning to school, or becoming permanently disabled). Some plans may or may not be available to you, depending on things like your loans types, outstanding loan balance, and remaining payment term.

Review repayment plans, instructions on finding out if you're eligible for a specific plan, and ways to apply.

If you already know which option you want to change to, you can get started:

Some plans may not be available to you, depending on things like your loan types, and remaining payments.

Yes, if you are enrolled at least half time you're most likely eligible for an in-school deferment. It's easy to log in, find out if you're eligible and request a deferment.

A deferment allows eligible borrowers to postpone student loan payments under a variety of situations (e.g., economic hardship, attending school more than half-time, serving in the Peace Corps, etc.). Keep in mind that interest still accrues, so you may end up paying more over the life of your loan. It's easy to log in and request a deferment.

Forbearance allows eligible borrowers to postpone student loan payments. Keep in mind that interest still accrues, so you may end up paying more over the life of your loan. It's easy to log in and request forbearance.

Yes, you may be eligible to postpone your federal student loan payments while actively serving in the Military, Peace Corps, or AmeriCorps.

U.S. Military

Payments may be postponed through a Military Deferment. It's easy to log in and find more information about Military Deferment.

Peace Corps

Payments may be postponed through a Peace Corps Volunteer Deferment or an Economic Hardship Deferment. It's easy to log in and find more information about Peace Corp Volunteer and Economic Hardship Deferments.

AmeriCorps

Payments may be postponed through forbearance. It's easy to log in and find more information about forbearance.

In general, loan consolidation combines multiple loans with many interest rates and payments into a single loan.

The Power of ONE

A Direct Consolidation loan offers you:

  • One loan.
  • One fixed interest rate.
  • One monthly payment.
  • One loan servicer—of your choice!
  • One contact for managing your student debt—online and on the phone.

The Power of CHOICE

Consolidation gives you the opportunity to choose one of the U.S. Department of Education's consolidation servicers to complete and service your Direct Consolidation loan.

Keep in mind it's important to understand if consolidation is the right solution for you.

In certain situations, you may apply to have all or part of your student loans forgiven. For example, if you are a teacher in a low-income community, work full-time in a public service job, or are totally and permanently disabled, you may be eligible.

Get more details and application instructions on loan forgiveness.

If your school closes while you're enrolled or soon after you withdraw, you may be eligible for a discharge of your federal student loan. There are certain steps that you need to take in order to have your loans discharged. Learn more about school closure Offsite or apply.

Don't wait to change to a more affordable option! Your federal student loans are unique and have a number of options to assist you if you're past due. But you have to take action. Learn how you may be able to:

Changing to a new plan can give you the relief you need. If you think you'll have trouble making your payments or are already past due, don't hesitate to contact us and we can help you get started.

Yes, past due payments (also known as delinquency) can negatively affect your credit rating. A past due payment can be reported to a credit bureau at any time. Don't wait to take action to fix past due payments! Your federal student loans are unique and have a number of options to assist you if you're past due. But you have to take action. Learn how you may be able to:

Changing to a new plan can give you the relief you need. If you think you'll have trouble making your payments or are already past due, don't hesitate to contact us and we can help you get started.

No, you will not have a past due amount at the time your deferment or forbearance ends. A deferment or forbearance acts like a "reset" button for your past due amounts and brings your loan current. However, you'll still have the principal balance you had prior to entering the deferment or forbearance, plus any additional interest that accrued. And, it's important for you to have made arrangements for a new, affordable repayment plan for moving forward so you don't become past due.

It's easy to request a deferment or forbearance and reset your loan.

Keep in mind that a deferment or forbearance does not remove any reports to credit bureaus related to past due amounts.

Paying anything is a great start and will reduce future interest accruals. But your account will remain past due, so you need to pursue other possible options to help your past due loan payments become current.

Don't wait to fix past due payments! Your federal student loans have a number of options to assist you if you're past due. But you have to take action. Learn how you may be able to:

It depends on your lender. Your lender has the right to add late fees to your account if your payments are past due 15 days or more.

If your account is past due, you need to first log in to our website and make a payment, or find out more information on requesting a deferment or forbearance to bring your account current.

Once your account is current, you may select a new payment due date for your eligible Great Lakes loans.

Contact us for more information.

If you're on active duty, there are a few things you can do to make managing your account easier. Read Servicemember Support—We're Here for You for more information, or contact us—we're happy to help answer your questions.

To determine how your military payments will be applied to your federal student loans, check with your unit or Commanding Officer. If you have questions about your student loans or payments we may have received, please contact us.

One way is to monitor the status of your account online. Once you're logged in, you can view your account summary, which provides the status of your account and important information about your loans.

Another way is to authorize someone to act as your Power of Attorney. This person will be able to sign documents and act on your behalf. Contact us for more information.

If you would like to receive a military deferment during the first 12 months you are eligible, you are only required to submit a verbal request.

After the 12 months, you are required to submit documentation to enter the program. When you're on active duty, it can be difficult to provide documentation. Having someone act as your Power of Attorney will allow them to complete necessary documentation to make the process smoother and continue your deferment without interruption.

When you enlisted in the service, you may have enrolled in a repayment program. You can find more information about your program and other military repayment programs from your Commanding Officer or recruiter.

You can access your student loan interest statements by logging into your account on mygreatlakes.org. Once you're logged in, just select Tax Filing Statements from the My Accounts menu. Your prior year's statement is available mid-January each year. Please note that only statements from 2010 onward are available online. Contact us for statements prior to 2010.

The 1098-E Student Loan Interest Statement is an IRS tax form that lists the amount of interest paid on your student loans during the previous year. You may be able to deduct some or all of this amount from the income you report on your federal tax return, which may reduce your income tax. Check with a tax advisor to determine which interest is tax deductible.

You'll receive a 1098-E for each account listed in your Account Summary. By adding the totals together, you can determine the total amount of student loan interest you paid for the year. Note that if you have loans with another servicer, you'll receive 1098-E information from them, too.

Read Your 1098-E and Your Student Loan Tax Information for more information.

Interest payments made on your student loan accounts in 2017 may be deductible on your 2017 tax return. The interest on payments received by 5:00 p.m. Central on December 29, 2017, is included on your 2017 1098-E.

Interest payments may include amounts that were applied towards principal. Capitalized interest and origination fees (part of your principal balance) are sometimes tax deductible. If you have questions about how the amount on your 1098-E statement was calculated, please contact a tax advisor.

When you file your taxes, you may need to include your servicer's federal tax ID number. You can find the number on your 1098-E, below your servicer's address.

The 1099-C Cancellation of Debt is an IRS tax form that lists the amount of debt that was cancelled on your student loans. The IRS treats debt cancellation as income, and Great Lakes is required to report student loan debt cancellation to the IRS. If applicable, you'll receive a 1099-C from Great Lakes with the amount of debt cancelled on your Great Lakes-serviced loans. You'll report the amount listed on your 1099-C statement on your federal tax return.

If you have student loan debt with another servicer that was cancelled, they may send you additional 1099-C statements.

If eligible, you'll receive a letter notifying you of the amount of debt that was cancelled on your Great Lakes-serviced student loans and a paper 1099-C statement by the end of January 2018. If you received loan forgiveness by applying for certain forgiveness programs, disabilities, or Borrower Defense to Repayment, you may receive form 1099-C.

You can access your student loan debt cancellation statements by logging into mygreatlakes.org. Once you're logged in, select Tax Filing Statements from the My Accounts menu to access your 1099-C.

You can easily access your three most recent billing statements on mygreatlakes.org. To view your detailed statements, click Billing Statement.

Your payment history is available on mygreatlakes.org. Select Payment History from the Payments menu to view recent transaction activity for all your Great Lakes-serviced student loans. Here, you can also see how your past payments were applied to your principal and interest balances.

Your student loan interest information is available on mygreatlakes.org. Your 1098-E statement for the previous tax year is first available in January. Select My Accounts > Tax Filing Statements  to access it.

You'll also receive an email notification when new student loan interest information is available.

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  • On a continual basis, we undergo internal and external security audits to ensure these high standards are met.
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In addition, we continue to enhance our website to stay on top of new technologies and continually upgrade all of the components of our information systems with the latest hardware and software to ensure it meets the latest security standards. Our goal is to protect your data and ensure it is never compromised. It's a job we take very seriously, every hour of every day.

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Great Lakes is committed to making its electronic and information technologies accessible to individuals with disabilities by meeting or exceeding the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794d), as amended in 1998. Section 508 is a federal law that requires agencies to provide individuals with disabilities equal access to electronic information and data comparable to those who do not have disabilities, unless an undue burden would be imposed on the agency. The Section 508 standards are the technical requirements and criteria that are used to measure conformance within this law. More information on Section 508 and the technical standards can be found at section508.gov Offsite .

If you require assistance or wish to report an issue related to the accessibility of any content on this website, please email accessibility@mygreatlakes.org. If applicable, please include the web address or URL and the specific problems you have encountered.